Do you want to see?

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1. Sajad-Aliraqi,

Aside of what people think, or how sensitive this topic, I hope we can get rid of politics because this discussion might bring something in relation, such as violation to brain.
So lately they are doing experiments on humans to restore vision by planting a chip into their brain, and this is an idea of Elon Musk.
I myself want to see, and I dismiss any negative issues that might happen. Like someone will spy on me through that chip, which is not logical at all.
Question is: Do you want to be able to see? If yes, what are the things that make you excited to see them, or you want to see what they look like. If no: Give a logical response. Your opinion is always respected, but it doesn't mean you will be convincing.

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2. Ryo-Bee,

I absolutely would, I can't possibly think of any reason why anyone would say no.

What I would add is, you can't get a proper answer from anyone now. Until someone is faced with something, the opinion and emotion would always be different, and this technology is far far away. Furthermore, you would not get anyone's opinion on the real circumstances of that time as if there were to be anything that could make every blind person see again I am sure it would be (rightly) strongly incentivised by governments to be used.

Also, spying is not a stupid thought at all, Tesla self-driving technology is well publisized to have seriously breeched privacy of users, while this may be different, we will all have to wait to find out. I am not saying that is a reason not to use it, but that is far from something to brush off.

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3. Naday,

I believe many of the people who would say no are those who never saw in their lives, and think it would be rather a chaos to get used on everything again and basically, having their world changed completely as the perception of some things might change greatly, even though it theoritically doesn't change. I'm one of those who wouldn't want to see for this same reason, but at the same time I'd like to see for a few minutes, to have a trial and to choose if I like or dislike, because I'm so used on doing things without sight that I can't even imagine how I would do some of them if I could see. It's like growing another part of my body suddenly, I feel, and I am not sure I would be able to have full control over it any soon.

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4. lucy_light,

Well yeah, this question. Surely, as it has been previously stated, I would like to give it a try, not sure what reaction I might have, but that is an unseen thing to be seen, just for the sake of the word game.
The way it would happen? I'm not yet fully convinced of this tech idea, but if I were to know, on multiple tested cases, with both scientifical and practical examples proving it, that it is really functional, I would indeed reconsider the option.
Why would I want to see, even for a bit? As everyone might say, the two main reasons are obvious, to know how the world looks, including the faces of my loved ones and to have the experience of doing things the way I didn't have the chance to, just to convince myself whether it is easier with a bit of sight, as I always thought it would be, but here comes the third one, which is rather personal.
Growing up among sighted people and being fully integrated into the basic educational system, I've developed a certain understanding and skill when it comes to visual perspectives, common language and I've had a wider view on the general way of seeing things, both meanings involved here.
Moreover, I've been always inclined towards the arts, having a broad imagination and finding that unique bit in everything, sometimes knowing stuff I was technically not supposed to, just by a sharp intuition, mixed with attention and pure luck of capturing every single piece of info around me.
I don't want to overpraze, I know there are many others in this situation, but here is the point. As a poem writer, I've always been curious to propperly see the world I've created, the colours and figures they always considered exceptional and fully described.
I'm not a genious, I'm just living life as I think it is, although the circumstances in which I've lost my sight when I was very little were annoyingly easily avoidable. Briefly, it was a surgery gone wrong, performed by a doctor who was not even supposed to be there at the time. However, I don't regret. All in all, this made me who I am and I blame nobody for it, I've accepted it and I'm trying to get the best of it all, but who says a glimpse into the world would hurt?
Best regards!

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5. spaceship,

Hi!
I would love to be able to see. The blindness adaptations that we have developed coupled with sight would possibly make us more eceptive of the world than the average.
I believe its better to be blind and then develop sight than to be born sighted, though I am possibly taking it into a weird direction.

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6. Sajad-Aliraqi,

The reason made me bring this topic up, is people that stated opinions of not wanting to see for absolutely unreal reasons. I dislike to hear blind people say we do not want to see because we should prove to the world that we can do things and we are strong beings. But what is the benefit of proving to the whole world by spending your entire life doing just that. And besides, who said the world cares about us doing things.
The things we do are not supernatural either, we are just happy doing things in life to prove to people that we can do them, but in fact, those things are done easily by sighted people, so it shouldn't be an important milestone.
That's what I think!

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7. spaceship,

It makes sense, though if we slightly modify it. If your intent is to prove to other people with incurable blindness that they have a much better future than they imagine, then its a perfectly selfless and noble venture. IF your aim is to prove to the sighted that they should not downplay the potentials of a blind person, keeping in mind that many people will never be sighted, then also it makes sense. But if you aim to prove that blindness is not a hurdle, then well, maybe consider getting sight, such that your adaptation skills not only compensate, but compliment your sight.

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8. Emerald,

@naday I used to think like this until I got an operation that restored a bit of my sight. It diddn’t last long but here is what I learnt. Your brain will basically make sense and your eyes will absorb everything into one message so when you process it’s naturally easy to go along with it. It seems much smoother and you don’t feel the need to do certain things like touch. For me it was a monologue constantly of what is around me. Noticing people’s features, how braille sticks out, how the room were layed out. However I had sight before so maybe my brain was just more relieved the connection was back than anything else.
I’ve heard that some people want to loose their sight because they don’t see the point in seeing anymore and they’ve already gotten used to not seeing. This was from someone who was about to loose their sight and wanted to loose it on their own turns so removed their eyes and lives as a blind person now. More of control to be honest but it’s a choice in the end I guess.

But seeing is actually really relaxing. I would recommend to anyone if they could they will not entirely regret it because once you see nature in its purest form, it is too beautiful. From flowers to insets to the creatures in the sea. Sometimes not seeing, for me, causes anxiety as you got to rely so much on differences senses that it gets overwhelming. But I feel like not seeing does allow your brain to develop a lot more than sighted so there are some benfits in a way.
Just my views of course.

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9. brave,

Greetings to all blind people. The first thing I want to say is that I can understand people who don't want to see. As Naday said, most of these people must have been blind from birth. However, I disagree with one. Just because you're used to living blind doesn't mean you can see badly. Even if you don't think it's a bad thing to see, it shouldn't stop you from living a more comfortable and free life. Some people may be afraid of it, perhaps thinking that seeing, accepting blindness, can have big and even bad consequences. If you ask me, the only difficult part of seeing for a blind person is getting used to life without blindness. People who have lived even a little while without being blind will understand what I mean. Just as it is difficult for a non-blind person to be blind, it is at least as difficult for a blind person to see. Of course, it may be easier for people who were not blind from birth to regain their sight than for people who were blind from birth. In any case, if you ever get the chance, I recommend everyone to try it. Personally I would do my best to try, I went blind when I was 9 and would love to see like before again. I just want to say one last thing. This is my opinion and I'm sure it won't apply to everyone. My life changed completely after I went blind at the age of 9. If I can see again now, my life will change again and it will never be the same again. If you agree with me on this point, I recommend you think about this as well. Continuing life from a different perspective will lead to a big change, this should be taken into account. But I can guarantee one thing: seeing in many ways will be better than you can imagine than living your blind life.

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10. Mrityunjay,

I was sighted at one point, so I surely would. Still have vivid memories.

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Zuletzt geändert von Mrityunjay, Mar 3 2024 07:29:33

11. sound2,

For me, as I've stated before, in this whole long discussion in this free table. I don't like the thought of anything planted in my brain. I here what every one else has said. Sure nature can be beautiful, and many art works, but for me, there have been some things of nature like the sea that I have enjoyed. Sure there are things that I've missed, but I don't regret it. I admit, there have been times, that I've been curious about having sight like looking at someone, or catching someone's eye, but it's been a curiosity, no more than that.

As for proving something, I don't want to proov anything to anyone. It's not just a blind thing or a disabled thing. Many sighted people want to proov things to each other as well. Look at sports, and how competitive people are. Like the oldest person to run so far, or the youngest person to run so far, or walk so far, or do things for charity or swim in cold water. Or some long sailing voyage to make a point.

Then there is the whole thing of, people struggled to get some respect from the sighted population. Would all that have been for nothing? It's like saying to a black person. Hey I can make you white, or we will all love the same, or there will just be male and female nothing else. Yes something different I know, but to me, there is some connection. I'm saying having sight doesn't mean, we will all live in paradise and get along with each other. If you look at the world of today.

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12. aayushi,

I don't want to sea it would be a big change start over again from the bigining and I am not sure if I might invest that many years to get to the present point.

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13. Mortem,

If there was a procedure that would have a high likelihood of enabling me to see to the level where I could drive, I would go for it. If there is a high amount of risk, or if the vision gained would not actually be that effective, I'd consider it but most likely wouldn't go for it.

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14. gemmi,

well folks to be honest, i really don't have the answer of whether I want to see or not. but if I will get the opportunity to see even for some time, I would like to try driving a car.

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15. Slavista,

My ansver? No, i don't want to see, i have lived 28 years without sight so far and i don't want to learn everything again, like this colour is blue, this one is gold, these lines on the ground are stairs etc etc...

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16. Mohammedradwan2003,

I think we'll have the skills to compliment our sight. The skills we learned as blind.

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17. Ephyra,

  1. Duh, yeah.
  2. Optical ilusions, colours, facial expressions, shapes of clouds, beautiful art and awesome landscapes...

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